Pharmacology Archives - Page 2 of 9 - The Emergency Medical Minute

Pharmacology

Podcast 540:   Zyprexa 

Contributor:  Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: Olanzapine (Zyprexa) is an atypical antipsychotic that can be used in a similar fashion to haloperidol for pain and nausea, including that with abdominal pain and headaches Olanzapine can be administered as an oral disolving tablets, intramuscular or intravenous injection Because Zyprexa is an atypical antipsychotic, it has a…

Read More

Podcast 539:  Coricidin Abuse

Contributor:  Rachel Beham, PharmD Educational Pearls: Coricidin HBP Cough & Cold (dextromethorphan and chlorpheniramine) is one of the more commonly abused over-the-counter medications Dextromethorphan, binds to multiple receptors, particularly at high doses Opioid receptors, causing respiratory depression, CNS depression NMDA receptors, causing agitation and hallucinations Serotonin-reuptake inhibition, which may lead to serotonin syndrome, especially when…

Read More

Podcast 534: Nerve Agents

Author: Michael Hunt, MD Educational Pearls: Organophosphate “nerve agents” were developed in the 1930’s These agents have cholinergic effects, which can be remembered by the mnemonic “SLUDGE” Salivation Lacrimation Urination Defecation  GI cramping Emesis  The “SLUDGE” toxidrome is mediated through the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Nerve agents also affect the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which leads to…

Read More

Podcast 531:  Migraine Cocktail 

Contributor: Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: The classic migraine cocktail includes: Reglan (or other dopamine antagonist), Benadryl, Toradol, Decadron, and IV fluids.  The most effective agent in the cocktail is a dopaminergic agent  Routine IV fluids have not shown efficacy  There is no evidence for pre-treatment of akathisia with diphenhydramine (Benadryl) Decadron reduces rebound headache …

Read More

Podcast 519: Malaria Drug Resistance 

Contributor: John Winkler Educational Pearls: There is increasing resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially in P. falciparum. This trend started with chloroquine, but is now spreading to the other first-line drugs.  Resistant strains have been identified in Cambodia and Thailand 220 million people were infected last year The best treatment of malaria is prevention from bites…

Read More

Podcast 516: Narcan and Pulmonary Edema

Contributor: Erik Verzemnieks, MD Educational Pearls: Important to realize complications can occur in the post-opioid overdose patient regardless of cause Narcan administration has been associated with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, although the mechanism of this is not quite known Symptoms include progressive shortness of breath and hypoxia.  Treatment is with positive-pressure ventilation and diuresis, similar to…

Read More

Podcast 514: Pain Control While on Naltrexone 

Author: Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: Suboxone, methadone, and naltrexone are commonly used as treatments for opiate use disorder.  Naltrexone is a full mu-opiate receptor antagonist, making acute pain control difficult in patients taking it.  Options for pain control in patients on naltrexone include nerve blocks, NSAIDS, ketamine, and high doses of opiates.  Of the…

Read More

Podcast 511: Ebola Treatment 

Author: Rachel Beham, PharmD Educational Pearls: There are currently many Ebola vaccines that are being studied, and one (recombinant VZV-Ebola vaccine) is currently being used in Africa. This vaccine has so far shown good efficacy in reducing Ebola infections and mortality from Ebola in those who do become infected.  There are antibody-based treatments that are…

Read More

Podcast # 501: Take Down Potions 

Author: Jared Scott, MD Educational Pearls: Study from Hennepin County EM studied the efficacy of different drugs for agitation, which included 737 patients Most patients in this study were male and *surprise* drunk Compared doses of common sedatives with primary outcome of sedation at 15 minutes (all intramuscular) haloperidol 5 mg ziprasidone 20 mg olanzapine…

Read More

Colorado MAT Part 4: Buprenorphine in the Emergency Department

Treatment with buprenorphine is easier, less time consuming and far more effective for management of opioid withdrawal and OUD than standard care with clonidine, IVF, haldol and other symptomatic therapies. Induction with buprenorphine is easy, requires no IV or labs, and is usually accomplished in 1-2 hours. It requires a chair, not a hospital bed….

Read More

 

Stay up to date by
joining our mailing list!