Medical Minute Archives - Page 3 of 64 - The Emergency Medical Minute

Medical Minute

Podcast 623: Acute Mountain Sickness

Contributor: Tom Seibert, MD Educational Pearls: Acute Mountain sickness (AMS) can cause headache along with fatigue, nausea, vomiting, insomnia Typically occurs above 6500 feet (not 65,000) in elevation   Acclimation to altitude can help prevent symptoms if not treated, AMS can advance to severe illness involving cerebral or pulmonary edema. Mild symptoms can be managed with…

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Podcast 622: High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE)

Contributor: Thomas Seibert, MD Educational Pearls: High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) typically occurs 2-4 days after arriving at elevation Symptoms include: Fatigue Dyspnea Cough Treatment includes: Descent to lower elevation  Oxygen supplementation Nifedipine Caused by sympathetic stimulation from hypobaric hypoxic exposure, causing uneven pulmonary vasculature constriction and when paired with a leaky endothelium, pulmonary edema….

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Podcast 621: Pediatric Psychosis

Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: Schizophrenia typically doesn’t present until age 13 and has a prodrome Prodrome includes months of gradual changes in behavior, starting with negative symptoms and progressing to positive symptoms Negative symptoms include losing concentration, poor memory, poor school performance, and personality changes Positive symptoms include hallucinations, which tend to be…

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Podcast 620: Prolactin and Seizures

  Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: Serum prolactin levels can be used to help differentiate epileptic seizures from non-epileptic seizures It is also released and elevated after epileptic seizures but not non-epileptic seizures A level must be checked 10-20 minutes after the episode and if possible a next day level should be checked to…

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Podcast 619: Other Uses for Zyprexa

Contributor: Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: Zyprexa (olanzapine) is a second generation antipsychotic with multiple other uses Excellent for treating nausea in patients undergoing chemotherapy or with THC hyperemesis syndrome Helps with the psychological and emotional aspect of pain Effective in treatment of headaches Can be given under the tongue Fewer incidences of dystonic reactions…

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Podcast 618: Treating Opiate Side Effects

Contributor: Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: Majority of patients experience side effects while taking opioids Most common include nausea/vomiting, puriitis, constipation; more severe and less common include respiratory depression, addiction and overdose Opiates can cause nausea, but ondansetron (Zofran) is the wrong treatment because it’s not antidopaminergic. Instead consider using metoclopramide (Reglan), olanzapine (Zyprexa), or…

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Podcast 617: Masks and Understanding Data

Contributor: Peter Bakes, MD Educational Pearls: Recent study looked at if mask wearing protects the mask wearer from infection This group found 1.8% of mask wearers got COVID while 2.1% of non-mask wearers became infected, which was not statistically significant This was not statistically significant and has been used to justify not wearing masks by…

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Podcast 616: MDIs for the Win

Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: Contrary to many assumptions, meter-dose inhalers (MDIs) are as effective as nebulizers in pediatric and adult patients Nebulizers are associated with higher rates of tremor, tachycardia; they cost more and are associated with longer ED stays Though it may take some convincing, in a patient that is physically able,…

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Podcast 615: Pediatric DKA

Contributor: Ryan Circh, MD Educational Pearls: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be the initial presenting condition of undiagnosed diabetes type I in pediatric patients Unlike adults, children typically need less fluid (i.e. 10 mL/kg bolus for those in shock followed by maintenance) Cerebral edema is a concern from rapid administration of fluids An insulin drip at…

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Podcast 614: Perichondritis

Contributor: Nick Tsipis, MD Educational Pearls: Perichondritis involves infection of not only the connective tissue of the ear but typically the cartilage as well Symptoms include erythema, ear pain, and fevers The most common bacterial cause is Pseudomonas. Perichondritis often occurs after a wound or piercing, but trauma is not necessary for the infection to…

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