Podcast # 423: Blunt Cardiac Injuries

Author: Mike Hunt, MD

Educational Pearls:

 

  • Blunt cardiac injuries most commonly occur in motor vehicle collisions, auto-pedestrian collisions, and from sports injuries
  • The more anterior right ventricle is the most commonly injured structure
  • Look for new EKG changes such as bundle branch blocks, ST changes, or other arrhythmias
  • New EKG abnormalities should prompt consideration of further workup and admission for telemetry
  • Patients may have an elevated troponin – but it is unclear when exactly this should be drawn after the injury

 

References:

Bellister SA, Dennis BM, Guillamondegui OD. Blunt and Penetrating Cardiac Trauma. Surg Clin North Am. 2017 Oct;97(5):1065-1076. doi: 10.1016/j.suc.2017.06.012. Review. PubMed PMID: 28958358.

Marcolini EG, Keegan J. Blunt Cardiac Injury. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2015 Aug;33(3):519-27. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2015.04.003. Epub 2015 Jun 10. Review. PubMed PMID: 26226863.

Summarized by Travis Barlock, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

Podcast # 419: Etripamil

Author: Don Stader, MD

Educational Pearls:

 

  • Etripamil is an intranasal calcium channel blocker in development for use in SVT
  • A recent study showed that etripamil has an SVT conversion rate of around 80%
  • Etripamil does not have the same feeling of “impending doom” that can occur with adenosine

Editor’s note: Etripamil is still in development and these results are from a phase II clinical trial.

 

References:

Stambler BS, Dorian P, Sager PT, Wight D, Douville P, Potvin D, Shamszad P, Haberman RJ, Kuk RS, Lakkireddy DR, Teixeira JM, Bilchick KC, Damle RS, Bernstein RC, Lam WW, O’Neill G, Noseworthy PA, Venkatachalam KL, Coutu B, Mondésert B, Plat F. Etripamil Nasal Spray for Rapid Conversion of Supraventricular Tachycardia to Sinus Rhythm. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Jul 31;72(5):489-497. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.082. PubMed PMID: 30049309.

Summarized by Travis Barlock, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

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Podcast # 418: Vertebral Artery Dissection

Author: Don Stader, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) contributes to just 2% of strokes overall but ~25% of strokes for patients < 30
  • VAD is associated with minor trauma (chiropractic manipulation, yoga), typically with neck extension and rotation.
  • VAD can cause posterior stroke symptoms (vertigo, diplopia, Horner’s Syndrome, Wallenberg Syndrome)
  • Overall a good prognosis with around 50% of patients recovering without lasting neurologic deficits.

References:

Debette S, Leys D. Cervical-artery dissections: predisposing factors, diagnosis, and outcome. Lancet Neurol. 2009 Jul;8(7):668-78. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(09)70084-5. Review. PubMed PMID: 19539238.

Gottesman RF, Sharma P, Robinson KA, et al. Clinical characteristics of symptomatic vertebral artery dissection: a systematic review. Neurologist. 2012;18(5):245-54.

Schievink WI. Spontaneous dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries. N Engl J Med. 2001 Mar 22;344(12):898-906. Review. PubMed PMID: 11259724.

 

Summarized by Travis Barlock, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

 

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Podcast # 416: Wide Complex Tachycardia

Author: Aaron Lessen, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • Defined as QRS over 120 ms and rate over 120
  • Two major rhythms = Vetricular tachycardia (VT) or SVT with aberrancy
  • Safest approach is to assume it is VT
  • Synchronized Cardioversion is preferred even for stable VT for multiple reasons including safety and efficacy
  • Procainamide is preferred pharmacologic option
  • Amiodarone is less preferred third option
  • Calcium channel blockers (i.e. diltiazem) can worsen certain rhythms and should be avoided

References:

Long B, Koyfman A. Best Clinical Practice: Emergency Medicine Management of Stable Monomorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. J Emerg Med. 2017 Apr;52(4):484-492. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2016.09.010. Epub 2016 Oct 15. Review. PubMed PMID: 27751700.

Summarized by Travis Barlock, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

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Podcast #409:  Acute CHF Second Liners

Author: Nick Hatch, MD

Educational Pearls:

 

  • Quick review on typical treatments for acute CHF:
    • Nitrates are a mainstay to reduce preload
    • Furosemide has fallen out of favor in regards to urgency but still essential; it can also be utilized in those with poor renal function
  • Before going into the weeds:
    • Phlebotomy can be used to remove volume and may be helpful in certain clinical scenarios
    • Trapping venous blood by using blood pressure cuffs on three of four extremities was a very early treatment of CHF

 

References:

Alzahri MS, Rohra A, Peacock WF. Nitrates as a Treatment of Acute Heart Failure. Card Fail Rev. 2016 May;2(1):51-55. doi: 10.15420/cfr.2016:3:3. PubMed PMID: 28785453; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5490950.

Paterna S, Di Gaudio F, La Rocca V, Balistreri F, Greco M, Torres D, Lupo U, Rizzo G, di Pasquale P, Indelicato S, Cuttitta F, Butler J, Parrinello G. Hypertonic Saline in Conjunction with High-Dose Furosemide Improves Dose-Response Curves in Worsening Refractory Congestive Heart Failure. Adv Ther. 2015 Oct;32(10):971-82. doi: 10.1007/s12325-015-0254-9. Epub 2015 Oct 31. PubMed PMID: 26521190; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4635178.

Huijskes RV, Hoogenberg K, Wiesfeld AC, Pijl ME, van Gelder IC. Phlebotomies as a treatment of serious heart failure due to haemochromatosis: a case report. Neth Heart J. 2009;17(11):438-41.

Burch, George E., and Nicholas P. DePasquale. “Congestive Heart Failure—Acute Pulmonary Edema.” JAMA 208.10 (1969): 1895-1897.

 

Summary by Travis Barlock, MS4  | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

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Podcast #400: ECMO

Author: Dylan Luyten, MD

Educational Pearls:

 

  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is similar to bypass
  • ECMO is being utilized routinely at some centers and even prehospital in cardiac arrest
  • There are two general types of ECMO:
    • Venovenous (VV-ECMO) is useful when the patient cannot oxygenate but has adequate heart function.
    • Venoarterial (VA-ECMO) is more like typical bypass and can be used in a pulseless patient

 

References:

Ouweneel DM, Schotborgh JV, Limpens J, Sjauw KD, Engström AE, Lagrand WK, Cherpanath TGV, Driessen AHG, de Mol BAJM, Henriques JPS. Extracorporeal life support during cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Intensive Care Med. 2016 Dec;42(12):1922-1934. doi: 10.1007/s00134-016-4536-8. Epub 2016 Sep 19. Review. PubMed PMID: 27647331; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5106498.

Tonna JE, Johnson NJ, Greenwood J, Gaieski DF, Shinar Z, Bellezo JM, Becker L, Shah AP, Youngquist ST, Mallin MP, Fair JF 3rd, Gunnerson KJ, Weng C, McKellar S; Extracorporeal REsuscitation ConsorTium (ERECT) Research Group.. Practice characteristics of Emergency Department extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) programs in the United States: The current state of the art of Emergency Department extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ED ECMO). Resuscitation. 2016 Oct;107:38-46. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.07.237. Epub 2016 Aug 11. PubMed PMID: 27523953; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5475402.

 

Summary by Travis Barlock, MS4  | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

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Podcast #377: Endocarditis

Author:  Nick Tsipis, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • Persistent fever or positive blood cultures should raise suspicion for endocarditis
  • Patients with recent dental procedures, recent cardiac surgeries are at risk, or who inject drugs are at higher risk
  • Physical exam findings may include fever with a new murmur, Janeway lesions, Osler nodes, and/or splinter hemorrhages

 

References:

Long B, Koyfman A. Infectious endocarditis: An update for emergency clinicians. Am J Emerg Med. 2018 Sep;36(9):1686-1692. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2018.06.074. Epub 2018 Jul 2. Review. PubMed PMID: 30001813.

Murdoch DR, Corey GR, Hoen B et. al. International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS) Investigators. Clinical presentation, etiology, and outcome of infective endocarditis in the 21st century: the International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 9;169(5):463-73. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2008.603

Podcast #374: Iliac Artery Endofibrosis

Author:  Sue Chilton, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • An unusual cause of leg pain that can mimic sciatica/claudication
  • Predominantly occurring in high endurance athletes, particularly cyclists and runners
  • More common in men
  • Check supine ABIs 1 minute after activity in the ED: a value < 0.5 is 80% sensitive

 

References:

Mansour A, Murney S, Jordan K, Laperna L. Endofibrosis: an unusual cause of leg pain in an athlete. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2016 Jan-Feb;56(1-2):157-61. Epub 2015 Jul 3. PubMed PMID: 26140352.

Peach G, Schep G, Palfreeman R, Beard JD, Thompson MM, Hinchliffe RJ. Endofibrosis and kinking of the iliac arteries in athletes: a systematic review. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012;43(2):208–17.

Podcast # 372: The Latest on Epinephrine in Cardiac Arrest

Author:  Don Stader, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • 8014 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest randomized to epinephrine vs placebo
  • 30-day survival was not dramatically better between groups (3.2%in the epinephrine group and 2.4% in the placebo group)
  • Functional neurological outcome was nearly identical at 2.2% and 1.9% of patients
  • Adds to literature that epinephrine provides little important benefit in cardiac arrest – focus on chest compressions and early defibrillation

 

Editor’s note: NNT for epinephrine to prevent one death in this study was 115 – compared to bystander CPR (NNT 15) and defibrillation (NNT 5) from prior studies.

 

References

Perkins GD et. al. . A Randomized Trial of Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.    N Engl J Med. 2018 Aug 23;379(8):711-721. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1806842. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Kitamura T, Kiyohara K, Sakai T, et al. Public-access defibrillation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan. N Engl J Med 2016;375:1649-1659.

Hasselqvist-Ax I, Riva G, Herlitz J, et al. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. N Engl J Med 2015;372:2307-2315.

Hagihara A, Hasegawa M, Abe T, Nagata T, Wakata Y, Miyazaki S. Prehospital epinephrine use and survival among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. JAMA. 2012 Mar 21;307(11):1161-8. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.294. PubMed PMID: 22436956.

Sanghavi P, Jena AB, Newhouse JP, Zaslavsky AM. Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic vs advanced life support. JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Feb;175(2):196-204. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.5420.

Podcast # 371: EKG changes of Hyperkalemia

Author:  Jared Scott, MD

Educational Pearls:

  • EKG changes do not necessarily correlate to degree of hyperkalemia
  • Traditional progression through peaked T-waves, flattened p-waves, QRS widening, and then sine-waves before asystole

References

Mattu A, Brady WJ, Robinson DA. Electrocardiographic manifestations of hyperkalemia. Am J Emerg Med. 2000;18:721–729.